Scientific Figures

The following figures have been designed for various publications, proposals, or for web use. If you're in need of a visual graphic to accompany your research, get in touch!

Figure describing the 5-step process for designing eco-engineering units for marine structures developed within the Ecostructure project. Full citation: Evans, A.J., Lawrence, P.J., Natanzi, A.S., Moore, P.J., Davies, A.J., Crowe, T.P., McNally, C., Thompson, B., Dozier, A.E., Brooks, P.R. (2021). Replicating natural topography on marine artificial structures – A novel approach to eco-engineering. Ecological Engineering 160. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoleng.2020.106144.

A diagram of the California coastal nitrogen cycle for a funding proposal.

Framework for a proposed research project on the Black Sea.

Figure describing the methodology used by Melanie Prentice et al. in testing the response of the invasive Didemnum vexillum to marine heatwaves as part of the Ecostructure project.

Figure illustrating porous carbon material.

Figure designed for Peter J. Lawrence, Ally J. Evans, Tim Jackson-Bué, Paul R. Brooks, Tasman P. Crowe, Amy E. Dozier, Stuart R. Jenkins, Pippa J. Moore, Gareth J. Williams and Andrew J. Davies. (2021) Artificial shorelines lack natural structural complexity across scales. Available at The Royal Society, Proceedings B.

Figure designed for Peter J. Lawrence, Ally J. Evans, Tim Jackson-Bué, Paul R. Brooks, Tasman P. Crowe, Amy E. Dozier, Stuart R. Jenkins, Pippa J. Moore, Gareth J. Williams and Andrew J. Davies. (2021) Artificial shorelines lack natural structural complexity across scales. Available at The Royal Society, Proceedings B.

Figure developed to show the integration between work packages as part of the proposed Black Sea research project.

Figure illustrating the process of creating porous carbon material.